Overstock CEO: Modern Financial System is a Ponzi Scheme, Collapse Will Bring Global Crypto Adoption

Patrick Byrne, the CEO of Overstock, stated in a recent interview that the entire modern financial system is a “big Keynesian magic money tree ponzi scheme”.

The statements were made during an interview with crypto YouTuber Naomi Brockwell on Monday, October 7.

The CEO of the tech-driven online retailer, which was one of the first major retailers to accept bitcoin, also believes that the modern financial system will eventually collapse, ushering in the global adoption of cryptocurrencies:

“People turn to it where they collapse, like Venezuela or Cyprus or Syria, something like that. When people start getting into it is when their own financial systems collapse.”

When asked about the role of governments in regulating cryptocurrencies, Patrick admitted being a national security libertarian. He believes that know-your-customer (KYC) and anti-money laundering (AML) requirements are important tools to keep criminal activity from thriving on the crypto sphere:

“I guess I must confess, as revolutionary as I am – I’m what you could call a national security libertarian. So I worry about threats to our country. And that means that KYC and AML are not just things to be scoffed at.“

Patrick believes that it is possible to take blockchain to the point where it becomes completely anonymous. On the one hand he loves the idea of becoming truly free and anonymous, but on the other he acknowledges that there will be some bad actors that will take advantage of the situation to hurt others.

Patrick is of the opinion that there is a right balance between freedom and security but “the more the world gets digitized, the more there will be government surveillance.” He trusts that distributed ledger technology can remake society and hopes that authoritarian states are unable to exert control and own the technology. Specifically referring to China, he also expressed his concerns on the country’s plans to rank all its citizens based on a "social score" by 2020.

Patrick thinks that social barriers and stigma and the idea that Bitcoin is mainly used for illegal drug trades and money laundering, are what’s holding back crypto adoption. When asked if Bitcoin will become a worldwide currency or if it will always have specific use cases he replied:

“Now, whether Bitcoin is the one, whether Bitcoin has solved its speed problems or it’s another cryptocurrency, only time will tell.”

QuadrigaCX Co-Founder Traded Away Users’ Funds as Sole Operational Director: Report

  • More than $220 million worth of users' funds absconded-with by QuadrigaCX co-founder
  • Stollen funds used for trading on "competitor exchanges" - for a loss

Reportedly deceased QuadrigaCX co-founder Gerald Cotton withdrew customers' funds to trade on both spot and leveraged margin exchanges, incurring significant losses in the process, alleges the latest public report on court proceedings surrounding the incident.

The report, the fifth commissioned to the global accountancy firm Ernst and Young (EY) by the Supreme Court of Nova Scotia, found that a vast sum of cryptoassets were transferred from QuadrigaCX exchange wallets to wallets operated by “competitor” exchanges and controlled Cotton, between the period 2016-19. The vast majority of the transfers occurred under Cotton’s alias “Chris Markay.”

Specifically, 9,450 bitcoin, 387,738 ether and 239,020 Litecoin were said to be transferred from QuadrigaCX in this way, and the questionable transfers resulted in “overall trading losses” trading on both spot and margin exchanges.

An additional sum of 21,501 bitcoin was also transferred to an exchange wallet controlled by Cotton, although it is unknown precisely how much of this sum originated from QuadrigaCX wallets. The proportion is unknown because the wallet is held in an offshore location not obliged to comply with EY’s requests for full accounting details. EY added however, that this information has been given to law enforcement of the unspecified jurisdiction.

 

 

EY also claim that Cotton traded on QuadrigaCX itself, using what were likely false deposits of fiat currency to buy cryptocurrency on the platform and counter-trade customers. About 300,000 trades were made from these “unsupported deposits,” which helped beef up QuadrigaCX’s trading volume and trading revenues.

The EY report outlines some generally poor practices that seem to have enabled the scandal, includin poor Know-Your-Customer (KYC) standards enforced on the exchange, which enable the easy exploitation of the platform; no separation between users’ wallets and the exchange’s wallets; and a “significantly flawed” financial reporting and operational control operating infrastructure, which EY claim were largely directed by Cotton alone and in which “typical segregation of duties and basic internal controls did not appear to exist.”

An Unpaid Bill

The QuadrigaCX story has been so big as to make it to non-crypto media in Canada. It has recently been reported by the CBC that Cotton’s alleged exploits have left former customers in the lurch, to as much as $250 million (Canadian) of unreturned funds.

EY claim that roughly 76,000 users’ funds are stuck in limbo as, in effect, unpaid IOUs, and confirm a figure of $214.6 million CAD remains unpaid.