Dow Jones Partners With Brave Browser To Trial Basic Attention Token

  • The Dow Jones Media Group has partnered up with Brave to offer users premium content and test its basic attention token.
  • Barron's and Marketwatch will become verified publishers on BAT's platform.
  • A limited number of users will receive access to premium content from Dow Jones Media Group.

In a thus far revolutionary move, the Dow Jones Media Group, a subsidiary of Dow Jones and publisher of Barron’s, has signed a deal with the ad-blocking Brave browser. The deal is set to see Dow Jones’ publications become verified publishers, potentially allowing users to pay for premium content with its Basic Attention Token (BAT).

Two years ago, multiple publications, including the Wall Street Journal, itself published by Dow Jones, dubbed Brave’s ad blocking manoeuvres “illegal”. Aligning themselves with the New York Times and Washington Post, it seemed that such a stance was invariably set in stone. 

Now, all of this has seemingly changed, as the Dow Jones Media Group is currently offering those who download Brave 24 months of free access to its Barrons.com website and/or to a premium MarketWatch newsletter. 

Explaining their new position, Barron’s senior vice president, Daniel Bernard, said:

“As global digital publishers, we believe it is important to continually explore new and emerging technologies that can be used to build quality customer experiences.”

Daniel Bernard

Dow Jones Media Group is not the only publisher who’s now on board. According to Brave’s Chief Executive, Brendan Eich: “Our discussions have become much better over the years. We’ll have other big publishers we’re announcing as partners.”  

Brave is unique in that it not only blocks ads, but also has software that tracks online behaviour and passes it on to other entities. Now used by over two million people every month, its popularity shows just how seriously internet users take their security and privacy.

Brave’s BAT Token

Brave’s intention is not to put a stop to advertising entirely, but to deliver ads in a more privacy-sensitive way. This will eventually mean ad revenue for the publishers who invest in it, and with this in mind, a cryptocurrency-based payment system already exists.

The browser’s Basic Attention Token (BAT) is set to allow advertisers to not only pay publishers, but also subsume a portion of the proceeds and distribute them amongst all who use Brave. Although said system is not yet completely functional, publishers are already able to earn some revenue through users’ BAT payments.

Such payments are distributed monthly by Brave, who gives the lion’s share to sites with the most activity. As part of this scheme, publishers, YouTubers and Twitch video streamers can all sign up free of charge to mark themselves as being eligible to receive tokens form users.   

Dow Jones Media Group will now become BAT verified publishers as a result of the deal signed on Wednesday, meaning it will be possible to pay for premium content with Brave’s BAT tokens.

Those Banned From Facebook May Not Be Able to Use Its Cryptocurrency Libra

Facebook’s two days of congressional hearings on the social media giant’s cryptocurrency ambitions seemingly revealed that those who have been banned from Facebook may not have access to Libra.

During the congressional hearing Facebook had to answer some tough questions, and one of them came from Representative Sean Duffy, which asked the company’s cryptocurrency head, David Marcus, who’ll have access to Libra.

The Congressman initially asked Marcus who could use the cryptocurrency, to which Calibra’s CEO answered: “anyone that can open a Calibra account, that can go through KYC [know-your-customer checks] in countries where we can operate.”

Duffy then referenced two individuals banned from Facebook for violating its community guidelines, Louis Farrakhan and Milo Yiannopoulo, and asked whether they’ll be able to use the social media giant’s cryptocurrency.

Marcus ended up replying he doesn’t “know yet,” after seeing Duffy hold a $20 bill and ask hin who can use it. His point was that cash doesn’t discriminate, and that anyone who can hold it can use it.

While throughout the hearing Marcus tried to point out the company will follow appropriate regulations and comply with lawmakers, Duffy responded that a proper answer would be “as long as you abide by the law, you can use Libra.” The fact he didn’t get this answer, Duffy said, gave him “great pause.”

Speaking to The Daily Beast Elka Looks, a Facebook spokeswoman, clarified Marcus addressed the Congressman’s concerns later on in the hearing. She stated:

For Libra, anyone who is engaging in lawful activity will be able to transact on the network. Facebook will have no say. For Calibra, there is no policy in place yet, but we will share it when it is closer to being finalized.

The news outlet adds that Calibra, Facebook’s wallet to send, receive, and hold Libra, doesn’t yet have final terms of service or a privacy policy. All of this means that those who’ve been banned on Facebook may not have access to its cryptocurrency.

As CryptoGlobe covered, Congressman Warren Davidson implied during the hearings Facebook’s crypto is a ‘shitcoin’ as it doesn’t have some of the properties bitcoin has. The Congressman made it clear bitcoin has no central authority that can censor transactions or dilute its value, while Libra has the Libbra Association.