Breaking Story: Bitcoin Scammers Email Bomb Threats, Causing Evacuations Across The U.S.

Kevin O'Brien

Numerous evacuations have taken place across the United States on December 13th after scammers sent bomb threat emails demanding bitcoin payment to a number of businesses, companies, schools, and other entities, according to reports.

No Evidence of Explosives Yet

As of press time, authorities indicated there is not any evidence so far of any explosives detonating or actually being placed. However, police are asking people to remain vigilant as they work through the threats.

It is not yet clear how far the email threat has spread, but law enforcement in numerous jurisdictions across the country have released statements on social media and other outlets about the situation.

The Federal Bureau Of Investigation said it is aware of the threats and remains in contact with law enforcement across the country.

 

 

Speculation is the messages are robo-emails that were sent out in a group. The New York Police Department indicated on Twitter how it looks like they were sent to “cause disruption and/or obtain money."

 

 

Bomb Threats Asking For $20,000 In Bitcoin

A number of people on Twitter posted screenshots of the threatening email sent by the bitcoin scammers.

 

 

The email is printed in an article by Heavy.com.

It begins declaring that “my mercenary” has placed a bomb in “the building where your business is conducted” that would wound many people upon detonation.

In order to “call off my man,” a payment of $20,000 in bitcoin must be made to an address listed in the message. The scammer says the guarantee to not detonate “will become valid only after 3 confirmations in blockchain.”   

Different Versions Of The Messages

According to The Verge, there seem to be multiple versions of the email, some of which list a different type of explosive material.

The actual bitcoin wallet also looks to vary across messages. The Verge also wrote that it was able to confirm at least three wallets. It is not yet clear if anyone has actually paid the ransom. 

Buying Bitcoin At All-Time High Was Better Than Keeping Money In Argentinian Bank, Trader Reveals

Josu San Martin, a Mexico City-based Bitcoin “quasi-maximalist”, recently revealed that if the residents of Argentina, a country experiencing a major financial crisis, had purchased Bitcoin (BTC) at the “highest point of the ‘biggest bubble in history’” (in 2017),  they would have still “been better off” than leaving their funds in an Argentinian bank.

Earlier this month, Twitter user Matias (@MatiasTrader) had noted that Bitcoin had reached “an all-time high in Argentinian Pesos (ARS).” This, as the South American nation is suffering from extremely high levels of inflation.

High Levels Of Inflation Does Not Necessarily Mean Bitcoin Will Help?

Interestingly, Twitter user Moises Cassab (@josusanmartin) pointed out that the main argument being made is that the Argentinian Peso is a “terrible store-of-value (SoV).” Moises also appeared to suggest that there was no meaningful relationship between the declining value of Argentina’s national currency and the arguably better performance of Bitcoin, the world’s most dominant cryptocurrency.

Moises remarked: 

Buying Celine Dion 2020 tickets would of outperformed the arg peso. Tell me how Celine Dion tickets are a terrible store of value.

Venezuelans Still Need To Use The Bolivar “To Survive”

According to Josu San Martin:

In a long enough timeline, the Argentinian peso doesn't look that much different from any other Latin American currency.

Indeed, the residents of other nations in the same region such as Venezuela are enduring one of the worst economic crises in their country’s history. However, recent reports which appeared to have suggested that cryptocurrencies were increasingly being used as a hedge against inflation in Venezuela may not be entirely accurate.

Focusing On Basic Necessities

Alejandro Machado, the co-founder of the Open Money Initiative (OMI), a project dedicated to assisting nations with “collapsing monetary systems,” had revealed recently that the citizens of Venezuela have not completely abandoned the Bolivar.

Although Machado acknowledged that bitcoin trading in Venezuela had reached record-level highs, he said that Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies were “too technical” for most Venezuelans. He also mentioned:

Access to products [in Venezuela] is the number one thing [that people are looking for.] Do I have enough to eat this week or do I need to reinvent the ways that I access food?