Google to Allow Regulated Crypto Exchanges to Buy Ads in U.S. and Japan

Siamak Masnavi

On Tuesday (25 September 2018), CNBC reported that Google, from October, will end its outright ban on all crypto-related advertising, and allow regulated crypto exchanges to buy ads on its platform in the U.S. and Japan.

On 14 March 2018, Google announced that it had updated its financial services related ads policy to disallow all crypto-related advertising; this included ads related to initial coin offerings (ICOs), crypto wallets, crypto trading advice, and even crypto programming courses. Crypto companies of any kind would not be allowed to advertise via any of Google's ads products. This ban would go into effect in June 2018.

Back then, Google's Director of Sustainable Ads, Scott Spencer, told CNBC:

"We don't have a crystal ball to know where the future is going to go with cryptocurrencies, but we've seen enough consumer harm or potential for consumer harm that it's an area that we want to approach with extreme caution."

What Google seemed to be doing was following in the footsteps of Facebook, which had announced its own ban on all crypto-related advertising on 30 January 2018. Ads that violated Facebook's ads policy would be banned not only on the Facebook app, but also "in other places where Facebook sells ads, including Instagram and its ad network, Audience Network, which places ads on third-party apps."

Google announced today's change in policy via the Advertising Policies support section of its website in a Change Log post titled "Update to Financial products and services policy (October 2018)":

"The Google Ads policy on Financial products and services will be updated in October 2018 to allow regulated cryptocurrency exchanges to advertise in the United States and Japan. Advertisers will need to be certified with Google for the specific country in which their ads will serve. Advertisers will be able to apply for certification once the policy launches in October. This policy will apply globally to all accounts that advertise these financial products. For more details, see About restricted financial products certification. The Financial products and services page will be updated once the policy goes into effect."

This new policy is applicable to advertisers located anywhere, but the ads can only be run in the U.S. and Japan.

Google seems to be once again copying Facebook when it comes to crypto-related advertising. On 26 June 2018, Facebook announced that it was going to relax the ban it had introduced in January, saying that from this date, it would be allowing "ads that promote cryptocurrency and related content from pre-approved advertisers" (while continuing to "prohibit ads that promote binary options and initial coin offerings").

Featured Image Credit: Photo via Pexels.com

JPMorgan Pays $2.5 Million for Overcharging Cryptocurrency Fees

JPMorgan Chase has reportedly agreed to pay $2.5 million to settle a class-action lawsuit filed against the financial institution in 2018, over it allegedly overcharging customers who were buying cryptocurrencies with Chase credit cards.

According to Reuters, JPMorgan Chase was overcharging users for buying cryptocurrencies as these transactions were being classified as cash advances. As part of the deal, JP Morgan did not admit to any wrongdoing to the 62,000 members of the class-action lawsuit, but a motion filed in Manhattan federal court reads the financial institution agreed to pay customers $2.5 million, noting it will see class members get “about 95% of the fees they said they were unlawfully charged.”

It adds:

.Chase has agreed to enter into this Agreement to avoid the further expense, inconvenience, and distraction of burdensome and protracted litigation, and to be completely free of any further claims that were asserted or could have been asserted in the Action.

One of the plaintiffs, Brady Tucker, reportedly claimed JPMorgan Chase violated the Truth in Lending Act since it did not inform its customers crypto purchases were being treated as cash advances. This saw them pay higher fees, which the bank then refused to refund and led to the class action lawsuit.

At the time the lawsuit was filed JPMorgan was seemingly hostile toward cryptocurrencies, with its CEO Jamie Dimon claiming bitcoin was a “fraud.” Since then, the bank has launched its own stablecoin called JPM Coin.

As CryptoGlobe reported, a report published by JPM late last month showed that using their “intrinsic value calculation,” developed by in-house analyst Nick Panigirtzoglou, bitcoin is correctly valued after the recent halving event.

Featured image by Drew Beamer on Unsplash.