Letter Bombs That Exploded in Netherlands Reportedly Tied to Bitcoin Extortion Scheme

Two letter bombs that exploded in two post offices in the Netherlands earlier today, February 12, were reportedly part of a bitcoin extortion scheme demand BTC to stop sending out the bombs.

According to local news outlet Telegraaf, those behind the extortion scheme were threatening businesses with the letter bombs while demanding an undisclosed amount of bitcoin to stop sending those out. The specific amount was reportedly not disclosed as it could harm the ongoing investigation.

The news outlet adds that over half a dozen letter bombs have been sent so far this year to locations in Amsterdam, Rotterdam, and Utrecht. The two letter bombs that exploded today were at a sorting office in Amsterdam of Dutch bank ABN Amro, and at the post room of Japanese electronics firm Rich on Kerkrade.

No injuries have been reported, and Dutch police are currently investigating the letter bombs. These are believed to have been sent by the same person to various businesses, including petrol stations, hotels, real estate agencies, and others.

Amsterdam police clarified that at ABN Amro’s offices an employee heard a hissing sound before throwing the letter, a move that likely helped reduce the damage.

The employee threw the letter away and there was a small explosion.

The letter bombs were reportedly followed by warnings, although details about these haven’t been disclosed. Ricoh clarified that the explosion in Kerkrade damaged its post room but added that “thankfully there were no injuries,” although those involved “are of course very shocked.”

Featured image by Liam Truong on Unsplash