Lithuania: Central Bank Policy Update Opens Crypto Investment Funds to Professional Investors

The Central Bank of Lithuania has recently updated its policies on cryptocurrencies and initial coin offerings (ICOs), effectively allowing cryptocurrency-based investment funds to operate in the country.

According to Finance Magnates, the central bank has reportedly attempted to give financial market participants (FMPs) a “level playing field” when looking into the nascent industry. The Bank of Lithuania has now established that FMPs can launch investment funds for “virtual assets,” and has created parameters for how and when these assets can be used as a payment method.

The documents read:

Taking into account current market developments and evolving regulatory regimes as well as seeking to ensure a level playing field for all financial market participants, the Board of the Bank of Lithuania has updated its position on virtual assets and initial coin offering[s].

The central bank’s new policy means professional investors can create funds for digital assets, and that private companies can receive cryptocurrency payments processed by third-party exchanges, that turn them into local fiat currency.

It notes, however, that FMPs can’t accept digital assets if they’re then required to repay them, with or without interest. They’re also prohibited from issuing cryptocurrency-based loans, or from accepting virtual assets as collateral, unless they’re legally seen as securities.

Per the central bank, FMP should still attempt to separate their traditional financial activities from those related to virtual assets. They should, in fact, not provide services related to the cryptocurrency industry.

Crypto Growing in Lithuania

In Lithuania, the cryptocurrency scene has notably been growing. Recently, cryptocurrency wallet provider Blockchain.com opened offices in the country, and the amount raised by ICOs based in the country has kept on growing.

According to the report, it may have been behind Lithuania’s recent move, as the country saw a need for tougher anti-fraud measures with the growing popularity of the fundraising practice. As CryptoGlobe covered, in April of last year the central bank initiated a dialogue between crypto investors, banks, and regulators.

JPMorgan Chase Positively Wades Into Crypto After Years of Hate

Colin Muller
  • JPMorgan is now servicing Gemini and Coinbase
  • The move represents a full reversal of JPM's stance
  • Crypto is now deeply institutionalized

The financial services giant and bank JPMorgan Chase & Co have seemingly reversed on a long-held stance, that crypto is bad, by beginning to service U.S. cryptoasset exchanges Gemini and Coinbase.

JPMorgan’s apparent reversal comes after years of institutionalized disdain for crypto, with the bank’s CEO Jamie Dimon being a vociferous critic circa 2017. According to Bloomberg, JPMorgan had been conducting due diligence on the exchanges “for months” before making the move. The bank’s adoption of crypto signals what can only be a highly regulated crypto-fiat landscape.

During 2019, JPMorgan had in fact started to visibly thaw on the subject of crypto, even experimenting with their own distributed ledger tech in the form of the so-called “JPM Coin”.

Dimon displayed during an interview his awareness of the competition posed by crypto, directing his people to assume that crypto and/or Fintech was “coming [...] to eat your lunch.” Despite this, he was bearish on the prospect of Facebook’s Libra project succeeding or even launching, saying in October 2019 that it would “never happen”.

big dropJPM chart by TradingView

JPMorgan’s publically traded stock has fallen recently, retreating from all-time-highs set in December 2019 in February, even before the coronavirus pandemic started to wreck the markets in March. It is down about 37% from those highs, trading now at about $87.

Featured Image Credit: Photo via Pixabay.com