Brave Ad Rewards in Testing, to Go Live in Beta Version of Brave in ‘Weeks’

Colin Muller
  • Brave testing opt-in ads on developer version
  • No actual BAT payments yet - those coming in 'several weeks'

Testing of “ad display and delivery” is now live on the developer version of the Brave browser, which is the platform for the Basic Attention Token (BAT) cryptocurrency. The developer versions of the browser are roughly equivalent to an alpha version, and according to the download page are “very early iterations and aren’t for the faint-of-heart.”

This does not mean, however, that users can start receiving BAT rewards for watching ads. That functionality will go live within “several weeks” on the browser’s beta version, at which time “Users will [...] be able to earn 70% of the revenue share” from ads on delivered Brave (the Brave company receives the rest).

Brave and BAT Lately

BAT, an ERC-20 token, is the currency of what is meant to be a new kind of consensual online advertising ecosystem. BAT runs on Brave, an open-source browser built on Chromium that blocks invasive advertisements and trackers.

Brave/BAT instead facilitates a direct connection between users and advertisers. BAT payments made to users can be used as donations, as payments to content creators, or traded on cryptoasset exchanges - or just used as money if someone will accept it.

The company’s blog says that direct advertising will always be opt-in - meaning that Brave still retains the function of a privacy-focused browser even without these features turned on.

Ultimately, Brave will support two types of ads: User ads and publisher-integrated ads. User ad functionality is described above - users must opt-in - but publisher-integrated ads provide opportunities for verified publishers to present ads within their websites or channels.

CryptoGlobe recently reported that 5.5 million users per month are now using Brave on various operating systems. Brave/BAT report that 28,000 verified publishers are signed up on the platform. 2018 has seen some big partnerships for the company, for example with the Dow Jones Media Group and the DuckDuckGo private search engine.

The current online advertisement reality which Brave seek to disrupt, fueled by invasive tracking of users’ actions, is widely thought to be broken and even “dystopian.”

U.S. Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin 'Fine' With Launch of Facebook’s Libra

The secretary of the U.S. Treasury, Steve Mnuchin, has revealed he is “fine” with the launch of the Facebook-led cryptocurrency Libra, as long as the project follows strict financial rules.

According to a report published by Bloomberg, Mnuchin revealed his thoughts on the Libra cryptocurrency while speaking in a Washington, D.C. hearing of the House Financial Services Committee, responding to a question from a lawmaker. He was quoted as saying:

I’m fine if Facebook wants to create a digital currency, but they need to be fully compliant. In no way can this be used for terrorist financing.

Since Libra was announced back in June of this year, Mnuchin revealed he has met with Facebook various times to discuss regulatory concerns, something that slowed the cryptocurrency’s pace towards its launch, expected in 2020.

The cryptocurrency is set to be governed by the Libra Association, and is reportedly going to be backed by fiat currencies and short-term U.S. Treasury bonds. Its backing in terms of fiat is set to consist of the European euro (18%), the Japanese yen (14%), the British pound (11%) and the Singaporean dollar (7%).

During the hearing, Mnuchin also addressed the U.S. potentially developing its own digital currency, and noted that both he and Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell don’t see a need for it in the near future. Mnuchin stated:

Powell and I have discussed this – we both agree that in the near future, in the next five years, we see no need for the Fed to issue a digital currency.

The European central bank, according to a report, may launch its own digital currency if cash usage drops and is the private sector fails to create an efficient solution for cross-border payments, which the financial institution deemed too expensive.

Featured image via Unsplash.