Apple Concedes To Developers with New Rules for Crypto Apps

Apple has made revisions to its crypto App rules following lobbying from developers. The new rules will apply to all cryptocurrency apps that can be downloaded on its AppStore.

Apps that mine cryptocurrencies using the iPhone’s chipset are strictly barred allowing only those that do not perform crypto mining.

The new guidelines deal with everything from ICOs to mining and the revised rules state:

  • Wallets: Apps may facilitate virtual currency storage, provided they are offered by developers enrolled as an organization.
  • Mining: Apps may not mine for cryptocurrencies unless the processing is performed off device (e.g. cloud-based mining).
  • Exchanges: Apps may facilitate transactions or transmissions of cryptocurrency on an approved exchange, provided they are offered by the exchange itself.
  • Initial Coin Offerings: Apps facilitating Initial Coin Offerings (“ICOs”), cryptocurrency futures trading, and other crypto-securities or quasi-securities trading must come from established banks, securities firms, futures commission merchants (“FCM”), or other approved financial institutions and must comply with all applicable law.
  • Cryptocurrency apps may not offer currency for completing tasks, such as downloading other apps, encouraging other users to download, posting to social networks, etc.

Reports state that a group called ‘The Developers Union’ requested relaxed guidelines.

Apple also wants developers to design their Apps to use power efficiently and requires that developers ensure Apps don’t rapidly drain batteries, generate excessive heat, or put unnecessary strain on device resources. Lastly, they must not include any third party advertisements displayed within them.

Apple’s App rules will affect a number apps already featured on Apple’s App Store, and all cryptocurrency applications looking to be published in the future.

Roger Ver Shows Interest in Buying Satoshi Nakamoto's Original Bitcoin Website

Bitcoin.com founder Roger Ver has shown interest in buying the Bitcoin.org website, which was originally registered by Bitcoin creator Satoshi Nakamoto and developer Martii Malmi.

As CryptoGlobe reported, on a GitHub post Cobra Bitcoin, the pseudonymous co-owner of Bitcoin.org, has announced he will be gradually reducing his involvement with the website and leave it “in trusted hands.”

In his original post Cobra noted he had some people in mind, but asked for individuals or organizations that could be a good fit to maintain the website, which is currently being used to onboard new users into the flagship cryptocurrency and ranks highly for the term “bitcoin” on search engines.

Cobra has been widely criticized in the cryptocurrency community proposing changes to Satoshi Nakamoto’s original Bitcoin whitepaper, and has seen mixed reactions to his announcement of reducing his involvement in the website. On Reddit, one user asked whether he would sell the website to Roger Ver.

Roger, taking advantage of the opportunity, responded via his MemoryDealers handle to say he has “cash in hand,” showing interest in acquiring the domain. Ver is well-known for running Bitcoin.com and campaign in favor of bigger blocks on the Bitcoin blockchain. In August 2017, he moved his support to Bitcoin Cash (BCH).

Speaking to CoinTelegraph, Ver noted he would “gladly buy” the Bitcoin.org website, but does not expect Cobra to sell it to him. He added he hasn’t made any efforts outside of that comment to buy the domain. As to who would be best suited to take over Bitcoin.org, he said:

Maybe a Bitcoin Foundation-like organization that is made up of the businesses building on crypto. The [Electronic Frontier Foundation] EFF might not be bad either. Anyone who supports free expression of ideas would be better than the current group.

When asked what he would use the domain for, he said it would be used to promote “peer-to-peer electronic cash systems.” Ver asserted, however, he hasn’t put much thought into it as he doesn’t expect to be given a chance to buy the website.

Featured image via Bitcoin.org.