SEC Launches its Own Fake ICO as Warning to Investors

Avi Rosten
  • The SEC's very own coin named "HoweyCoin" comes complete with a website featuring a team, testimonials and a whitepaper
  • The regulator hopes the fake coin will educate would-be investors about fraudulent ICOs

The SEC (The US Securities and Exchange commission) has today announced an intriguing new initiative designed to educate investors about fraudulent ICOs.

The regulator has launched its own ICO - HoweyCoin - complete with a website showcasing the ICO pre-sale, team, whitepaper - and even tweets touting the potential of the new coin.

The coin aims to revolutionize the travel business, explaining that most travel businesses need “processing, centralized currency and…nickel and dime fees that add up to literally billions.”

Howeycoin differs, however, because:

“HoweyCoins utilize the latest crypto-technology to allow travelers to purchase all segments without these limitations, allowing HoweyCoin users to buy, sell, and trade in a frictionless environment – where they use HoweyCoins to purchase travel OR as a government-backed, freely tradable investment – or both!”

HoweyCoin

The twist is that HoweyCoin is fake - and users who try and invest in the sale are redirected to the SEC’s educational site which reads:

“If You Responded To An Investment Offer Like This, You Could Have Been Scammed – HoweyCoins Are Completely Fake!”

SEC

Presumably named after the legal “Howey test” that the SEC uses to determine whether a financial instrument is a security, the ICO claims that investors can expect to receive 1-2% returns and offers token sale discounts to early investors alongside pictures of exotic locations.

In a press release, the SEC explained that the whitepaper included on the site was designed to mimic other whitepapers, and features:

“a complex yet vague explanation of the investment opportunity, promises of guaranteed returns, and a countdown clock that shows time is quickly running out on the deal of a lifetime."

SEC

While many within the crypto world regularly express their discontent with regulatory bodies and see them as stifling the industry, this latest move from the SEC will no doubt serve as an important warning to would-be investors, and might at least raise a smile from the regulator’s detractors.

Featured Image Credit: "Securities and Exchange Commission" by "Scott S" via Flickr; licensed under "CC BY 2.0"

U.S. Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin 'Fine' With Launch of Facebook’s Libra

The secretary of the U.S. Treasury, Steve Mnuchin, has revealed he is “fine” with the launch of the Facebook-led cryptocurrency Libra, as long as the project follows strict financial rules.

According to a report published by Bloomberg, Mnuchin revealed his thoughts on the Libra cryptocurrency while speaking in a Washington, D.C. hearing of the House Financial Services Committee, responding to a question from a lawmaker. He was quoted as saying:

I’m fine if Facebook wants to create a digital currency, but they need to be fully compliant. In no way can this be used for terrorist financing.

Since Libra was announced back in June of this year, Mnuchin revealed he has met with Facebook various times to discuss regulatory concerns, something that slowed the cryptocurrency’s pace towards its launch, expected in 2020.

The cryptocurrency is set to be governed by the Libra Association, and is reportedly going to be backed by fiat currencies and short-term U.S. Treasury bonds. Its backing in terms of fiat is set to consist of the European euro (18%), the Japanese yen (14%), the British pound (11%) and the Singaporean dollar (7%).

During the hearing, Mnuchin also addressed the U.S. potentially developing its own digital currency, and noted that both he and Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell don’t see a need for it in the near future. Mnuchin stated:

Powell and I have discussed this – we both agree that in the near future, in the next five years, we see no need for the Fed to issue a digital currency.

The European central bank, according to a report, may launch its own digital currency if cash usage drops and is the private sector fails to create an efficient solution for cross-border payments, which the financial institution deemed too expensive.

Featured image via Unsplash.